blvckzoro:

indikos:

burned my hand curling my hair today
worth it

Man listen….
blvckzoro:

indikos:

burned my hand curling my hair today
worth it

Man listen….
blvckzoro:

indikos:

burned my hand curling my hair today
worth it

Man listen….

blvckzoro:

indikos:

burned my hand curling my hair today

worth it

Man listen….

asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public. asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya
Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public.

asylum-art:

 Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya

Facebook

Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public.

shadesofmauve:

muepin:

spideypool:

Just because we are called “Freelancers”doesn’t mean we work for free.

Creative freelancers should just be called art mercenaries

HELL YEAH!

image

blexieae:

sh4ne:

malformalady:

Moldy lemon

image

they’ve been lying to us

shane its too early for this

"

I read several dozen stories a year from miserable, lonely guys who insist that women won’t come near them despite the fact that they are just the nicest guys in the world.

..I’m asking what do you offer? Are you smart? Funny? Interesting? Talented? Ambitious? Creative? OK, now what do you do to demonstrate those attributes to the world? Don’t say that you’re a nice guy — that’s the bare minimum.

“Well, I’m not sexist or racist or greedy or shallow or abusive! Not like those other douchebags!”

I’m sorry, I know that this is hard to hear, but if all you can do is list a bunch of faults you don’t have, then back the fuck away..

..Don’t complain about how girls fall for jerks; they fall for those jerks because those jerks have other things they can offer. “But I’m a great listener!” Are you? Because you’re willing to sit quietly in exchange for the chance to be in the proximity of a pretty girl (and spend every second imagining how soft her skin must be)? Well guess what, there’s another guy in her life who also knows how to do that, and he can play the guitar. Saying that you’re a nice guy is like a restaurant whose only selling point is that the food doesn’t make you sick. You’re like a new movie whose title is This Movie Is in English, and its tagline is “The actors are clearly visible”.

"

David Wong, 6 Harsh Truths That Will Make You a Better Person

This never gets old. 

(via denasynesthesia)

(Source: violetmaps)

Thanks for all the emails about your new jackets and comfy sweaters, Gap, but consider this:

  1. Camera: Nikon D800
  2. Aperture: f/1.4
  3. Exposure: 1/6400th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm

5am 5mile run…. Don’t mind if I do, window view….

(Source: empathist)